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Ohio Winter Mega Table Tennis Training Camp 0

The Ohio Winter Mega Table Tennis Training Camp presented by the Samson Dubina Table Tennis Academy will be held December 26-28, 2018 in Akron, Ohio.

All ages and levels of table tennis players welcome to participate in these three days of intense action! Training will be structured based on your individual needs of the game. In addition to the 5 hours/day on the table, there will be optional free lectures giving more details on designated topics.  During the lecture, there will also be Q&A sessions with Coach Samson Dubina and the other table tennis experts.

For more information and to register, click here.

Reverse Preparation in Table Tennis 0

Many table tennis athletes begin the season with refining their basic technique and working on developing a solid base for footwork and consistency with many systematic drills.  As they get closer to their peak table tennis tournament, they then begin a more tactical approach.  When they know which exact opponents they will compete against, then they begin specific tactical preparation for that exact opponent. 

This is good, but I’m going to propose a slightly different approach for you.

Consider starting the season by watching your target opponents and begin specific tactical preparation against them specifically.  As you learn the details of their table tennis game, figure out which parts of your game need developed and work the whole season to develop those necessary tools.

Why am I proposing this?

Because many table tennis players spend hours the night before an important tournament (like Olympic trials or Pan Am Games or World Championship) studying their opponents only to realize that their skillset hasn’t be properly training to beat that specific opponent.  With only 24 hours before the table tennis match, they are limited in how much they can adjust their preparation.  If the specific preparation had begun 6 months earlier, it would have been easier to develop specific serves, specific receives, and specific patterns to give the rival trouble.

For sure, the basic technique, consistency, footwork, etc. needs to be solid.  But in addition to those things, if you begin mentally preparing for specific opponents during the season, you can train with more focus and more determination and more specific for specific opponents.

So what if you possibly have 100 different table tennis opponents?  What should you do?

Just pick 5! Pick five of them and target developing the needed table tennis skills to beat those five players that are at your level or a level better than you.  Having rivals (in your mind) is one of the best ways to up the intensity in your table tennis training this year!

Samson Dubina

The Common Theme of Your Table Tennis Losses 0

If you are similar to many of my table tennis students, you probably have had really bad losses from time to time.  By a bad loss, I mean that you lose to a much lower-level player during a table tennis tournament match.  Perhaps you play about 12 tournaments per year.  In 6 of the 12 tournaments, perhaps you lose to someone whose skillset is definitely inferior to yours.  Instead of blaming it on “bad luck”, I want you to stop for a moment and consider some possibilities.

Not Warmed-Up

When the upsets happen, is it usually the first or second table tennis match of the day?  If so, it might be due to a lack of warm-up or lack of adjusting to the playing conditions.  Consider arriving one day prior and playing in the facility for a few hours on Friday night.  Also, get a practice partner lined up and know what routine you need prior to your first table tennis match.

Too Fatigued

When the upset happens, it is usually at the end of a long day?  If so, it might be due to fatigue.  If this is the case, then obviously you need to work on your fitness.  Also, make sure that you are eating and drinking a sufficient amount during the day of the table tennis tournament.

Different Playing Style

When the upset happens, is it usually against a particular playing style – chopper, looper, blocker, lobber, lefty, little kid, long pips/anti, short pips, or possibly a penhold table tennis player?  If so, then try your best to figure out the exact elements of the playing style that give you trouble and practice according to your findings.  Do you need to wait on the ball longer because it is slower?  Do you need to fight for the first attack?  Do you need to spin the ball more because your opponent continues to deaden the ball?  You need to understand the problematic playing style and master all the tactics against that particular style.

Wrong Mindset

When the upset happens, is it usually when you least expect it?  Do you often lose to players who don’t “look” like a good table tennis player? That big guy is like 80 years old…  That kid can barely see above the table…  That Canadian player was only rated 100…   If so, then try to take significant time to mentally gear up before the table tennis match, take your opponent seriously, and try to form a game-plan from the very first point.

Poor Pre-Tournament Preparation

When the upset happens, is it usually when you don’t prepare well prior to the table tennis tournament?  Good practice doesn’t always = awesome performance.  Lack of practice doesn’t always = poor performance.  However, you need to know yourself personally and what it takes for you to play your best.

In order to have peak performance, how many hours per week should be training 6 months prior to the table tennis tournament?  How many hours per week should be training on the very week of the tournament?  By detailed analysis of your bad losses, you should be able to identify the common themes for your losses and do your absolute best to perform well at 8 am or midnight, against tiny girls and old men, against defensive lobber and against offensive pips, against low-rated opponents and elite opponents.

Remember, tournament performance starts long before the tournament.  To have the best results possible, develop a good table tennis training routine, know what you need for warmup, develop a good level of fitness, know how to play against all playing styles, mentally gear-up before every table tennis match, and work hard to apply what you learn every day!

Featured Club: Broward Table Tennis Club 0

If you are looking for table tennis training or somewhere to play or compete in South Florida, then the Broward Table Tennis Club is the place for you. The BTTC is located in Dania Beach, Florida just south of Ft. Lauderdale. BTTC was chosen as one of four “National Clubs of Excellence” in the U.S. by the USATT (United States Table Tennis Association).

The BTTC has 17 ping pong tables and 2 Newgy Robo-Pong table tennis robots. Each playing court is separated by barriers and sits on world class Chinese red floor. Two lounges overlook the playing areas.

Memberships are available, as well as Open Play, Robot rentals and Private Lessons. The BTTC has some of the best Table Tennis Coaches including Marty Prager, Terese Terranova, Nelson Navarro and Brian Pace.

The BTTC is available for parties, corporate events, fundraisers, junior camps and more.

The BTTC hosts many table tennis clinics and tournaments throughout the year. The next tournament is the Robo-Pong BTTC Feb Open Team Tournament on Feb. 7-8, 2015.

For more information about the Broward Table Tennis Club, visit www.2xtremepong.com.