2014 Transplant Games of America – Table Tennis

Jena Newgarden
The 2014 Transplant Games of America were held July 11-15 in Houston, Texas.  The multi-sport festival event promotes the need for Organ and Tissue donation. Eligible athletes have received a life-saving transplant. The competition includes 18 different sports and games including table tennis, bowling, basketball, cycling, trivia challenge and more.

The Table Tennis Tournament included Men’s and Women’s divisions, ages 11-70+.

Congrats to our friend Gay Eisen of Nashville, Tennessee, who won the Silver in her age group. She practices on her Robo-Pong ping pong robot and has trained with Newgy’s Coach Roger Dickson for several years at the Newgy Table Tennis Center.

For complete tournament results, click here.

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You Don’t Play Well in Table Tennis Tournaments Because…

Jena Newgarden
Playing well in table tennis tournaments involves two major factors – being able to perform under pressure and being adaptable to the situation. This blog will focus on the second factor – being adaptable to the situation. There are five things that you can do to learn to become a tough tournament player!

1. You must learn to adapt to various playing condition quickly.  I would recommend practicing in various places on a regular basis – large courts and small courts, high ceiling and low ceiling, 1” ping pong tables and 3/4 “ ping pong tables, wood floor, cement floor and rubber floor, practice table tennis balls and 3-star Premium table tennis balls, bright lighting and dim lighting.  But you might say, “Won’t better conditions make me play better and poor conditions make me play worse?”  Not necessarily.  It all becomes a matter of what you are used to playing with.  Try to play at various table tennis clubs, try to use all the different types of tables at your club, try to play at various tournament venues, try to play at different friends’ houses, and try to play at various rec centers and learn to quickly adapt to each facility.

2. You must learn to adapt to various table tennis tournament times.  If you play in the U.S. Table Tennis Open this July, you might have a match on Wednesday morning at 9 .am., then you might have a match on Thursday night at 8:30 p.m.  For the table tennis players living in California, playing a 9 a.m. match at the U.S. Open in Michigan will actually feel like 6 a.m.!   The point is you must be able to perform at your peak at various times of the day.  So vary your practice times.  Wake up at 7 a.m. and have an 8 a.m. practice session with the Newgy Robo-Pong table tennis robot.  Go to a friend’s house at 9 p.m. and play some late-night games.  Prepare your mind and body to adapt!

3. You must learn to adapt to various warm-up levels.  Here is the biggest excuse for losses in table tennis tournaments, “I didn’t get enough warm-up!”  Often, you might go to the training hall with a practice partner, jog and stretch for 20 minutes, practice basic forehands and backhands for 20 minutes, do two footwork drills, do two serve-and-attack drills, and then wrap up with some games.  At the end of the session, you are feeling good and everything is warmed-up for the games.  In tournaments, you might not have a table available for warm-up.  You can warm-up you mind and warm-up your body with jogging and stretching. BUT you might not have a practice table available for your normal routine.  For this reason, I would recommend regularly playing some practice games in the beginning of your training session, so that you can learn to adapt quickly and perform well, even when you don’t feel great.

4. You must learn to adapt to various fatigue levels.  Here is the second major excuse that I often hear, “I was just too tired.”  Really?  You are going to lose that final table tennis match because you were just too tired.  Well, you certainly need to work on your table tennis conditioning so that doesn’t happen again!  You should do some intense workouts prior to your table tennis matches so that you learn to play with fatigue.  Go for a 4-5 mile jog then go to the club and play four hours of matches.  Do 30 all-out wind sprints, then serve a few short, low serves.  Do 50 push-ups, then play a 9-9 game against your rival at the club.  Train tired and learn to adapt even when you feel that you are completely out of energy.

5. You must learn to adapt to various table tennis opponents.  This is the biggest challenge in tournaments.  You might first play against a looper, then a long pips blocker, then a lobber, then a lefty, then a short pips smasher, then a chopper.  You can’t apply the same strategy to each opponent.  This is the main point in winning tournaments!  You must go into every match like a detective, trying to find every clue possible about your opponent’s strengths and weaknesses and you must be able to QUICKLY adapt to heavy pushes and light pushes, strong loops and weak loops, fast blocks and dead blocks.  I would recommend playing with as many different players as possible on a regular basis.  Instead of merely practicing with the same two people at the club, be willing to move outside of the norm and play with lower or higher rated table tennis players.  By playing a wide range of various styles, you will learn to adapt and become a well-rounded tournament player.

Samson Dubina

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2014 Tennessee Senior Olympics – Table Tennis, State Finals Results

Jena Newgarden
Congratulations to all the winners and everyone that competed in the 2014 Tennessee Senior Table Tennis Olympics this week in Franklin, Tennessee.  A special congrats to Newgy’s own Mr. Newgarden and Larry Thoman for bringing home the gold in their age groups!

Men’s Singles, 50-54

First Place – Donny Flowers

Second Place – Slawomir Waclawik

Third Place – Jonathan Foulds

Men’s Singles, 55-59

First Place – Larry Thoman

Second Place – Dennis Rountree

Third Place – Richard Bartelt

Men’s Singles, 60-64

First Place – Phil Yan

Second Place – Charles Collins

Third Place – Kenneth Simcox

Men’s Singles, 70-74

First Place – David Cass

Second Place – Everett Hunley

Third Place – Charles Kolitz

Men’s Singles, 75-79

First Place – John Edd Walker

Second Place – Paul Barnhart

Third Place – Jack Daves

Men’s Singles, 80-84

First Place – Dwain Kitchel

Second Place – Billy Neely

Third Place – Joe Camp

Men’s Singles, 85-90

First Place – Joe Newgarden, Jr.

Second Place – Sam Gennoe

Third Place – Robert Carpenter

Men’s Singles, 90-94

First Place – George Durr

Second Place – Ray Lundell

Women’s Singles, 50/80/85

First Place – Yiqing (Linda) Liu

Second Place – Sheila Arwine

First Place – Maureen Meeks

Women’s Singles, 55-59

First Place – Liliana Kohann

Second Place – Lyn Nunley

Women’s Singles, 60-64

First Place – Carol Sherman

Second Place – Phyllis Finnell

Women’s Singles, 65-69

First Place – Linda Cass

Second Place – Suzanne Glendenning

Third Place – Anne Paine

Women’s Singles, 70-74

First Place – Alice Tym

Second Place – Sondra Tornga

Third Place – Donna Beeler

Women’s Singles, 75-79

First Place – Ruth Gove

Second Place – Joyce Manis

Third Place – Mary Walker

Women’s Doubles, 50-54/55-59

First Place – Liliana Kohann and Yiqing (Linda) Liu

Second Place – Lyn Nunley and Sheila Arwine

Women’s Doubles, 65-69

First Place – Suzanne Glendenning and Linda Cass

Second Place – Anne Paine and Barbara Nelson

Women’s Doubles, 70-74/75-79

First Place – Alice Tym and Ruth Gove

Second Place – Sondra Tornga and Joyce Manis

Men’s Doubles, 50-54

First Place – Larry Thoman and Slawomir Waclawik

Second Place – Jonathan Foulds and Archie Jordan

Third Place – Donny Flowers and Carl Lewis

Men’s Double, 55-59

First Place – Dennis Rountree and Richard Bartelt

Second Place – Donald Rohrer and Ronald Riede

Third Place – Michael Nunley and Tommy Gates

Mens Doubles, 60-64/75-79

First Place – Charles Collins and David Cass

Second Place – Sam Gennoe and Jack Daves

Third Place – John Edd Walker and Charles Trail

Men’s Doubles, 65-69

First Place – Jim Campbell and Sanders

Second Place – Paul Barnhart and Ron Sullivan

Third Place – Mike Pethel and Phillip Kropp

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The Tournament Mindset – Samson Dubina

Jena Newgarden

During practice, most table tennis players focus 100% on themselves.  They think in detail about their own footwork, their own strokes, and their own serves.  They rarely consider their opponent.  In table tennis tournaments, they are mistakenly focused on themselves, wondering why they can’t win.

By performing beautiful forehand loops, your opponent will not drop dead.  You can’t win a match based on your awesome footwork.  The only way to win a table tennis match is to beat your opponent!  In matches, you should be 95% focused on your opponent and only 5% focused on yourself.  At the elite level, there are many detailed strategies.  I’ll deal with them in a future article.  For now, here are 10 basic questions that you should be asking yourself between games and between points!

Does my opponent prefer backhand or forehand when attacking?

Does my opponent prefer backhand or forehand when defending?

Where is my opponent’s middle (the transition point between backhand and forehand)?

Does my opponent win the majority of the points from strong attacks or does my opponent win the majority of the point from my mistakes?

Does my opponent feel more comfortable close to the table or far away from the table?

What are the most common serves that my opponent is using?

If my opponent has a particularly tricky serve that I continue to miss, what other options do I have to return it?

Does my opponent attack my short serve?  Does my opponent attack my long serves?

Does my opponent have any particular trouble with a specific serve?

Does my opponent have any particular trouble with a specific shot that I’m using or does he have trouble with a particular spin or particular location?

If you go through this list between every game, you will be able to better form strategies throughout the entire table tennis match!  Remember, winning is not just about great playing, winning is about making your opponent play poorly!

Samson Dubina

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Newgy Cincinnati Open 4-Star Table Tennis Tournament – Results

Jena Newgarden

Congrats to all the winners of the Newgy Cincinnati Open 4-Star Table Tennis Tournament this past weekend!

Open Giant RR
1st Samson Dubina
2nd Tapabrada Dey
3rd Hesam Hamrahian
4th Danny Dulkin
5th-8th Ali Khatami, Alex Averin, Seth Pech, and John Allen

U2400 Giant RR
1st Danny Dulkin
2nd Seth Pech
3rd-4th Nick Snider and Tapabrada Dey

u2000 Giant RR
1st Harsh Khandelwal
2nd Kosal Tith
3rd-4th Willians Calipo and Greg Smith

U1600 Giant RR
1st Chad Ryan
2nd Kevin Swan
3rd-4th Joe Ciarrochi and Yi Yan Xue

U1200 Giant RR
1st Yueling Zhang
2nd Newell Millard
3rd-4th Matt Seeds and Lin Wang

U1000 Giant RR
1st Laura Paglin
2nd Aubrey Morris

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Table Tennis Rally Statistics – Samson Dubina

Jena Newgarden1 comment
Statistics were taken for the length of the rallies at a professional table tennis tournament.  These statistics are fairly common across the board for all levels but differ based on game-style.

On average:

12% of serves are not returned

18% of points are won on the 2nd ball

26% of points are won on the 3rd ball

13% of points are won on the 4th ball

11% of points are won on the 5th ball

6% of points are won on the 6th ball

4% of points are won on the 7th ball

10% of points are won after the 7th ball

So as you can see, the serve, serve return, and 3rd ball attack are critically important during a table tennis match.  56% of the points do not last more than the 3rd hit.  For this reason, I would recommend practicing at least 56% of the time on the serve, serve return, and 3rd hit.

Serve

One of the best ways to improve your serve is to do it during a drill.  Instead of starting the drill with a warm-up serve, start each drill with a tournament serve such short backspin.  Ask your table tennis training partner to push long, next you loop the push, then you begin the footwork drill.

Serve Return

You probably have some serves that give you problems.  Ask your training partner to serve those problem serves again and again while thinking of new ways to return them.  Experiment by attacking slightly stronger or slightly slower, by pushing instead of looping, by adding to or stopping the sidespin, or countless types of returns.  In order to properly read the spin on a serve, you should watch the racket motion, listen to the contact, watch the bounce, and look for the logo on the ping-pong ball.

The 3rd Ball

Even if your opponent doesn’t miss your serve, he might give you an easy return in which you can attack.  If your 3rd ball attack is strong, it will put more pressure on your opponent to return more precisely.  When he tries to return shorter or lower or faster, he will begin making more mistakes.  Remember, it isn’t just about your serve in a table tennis rally. It’s also about what comes after your serve.

Samson Dubina

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2014 World Team Table Tennis Championships

Jena Newgarden
The ZEN-NOH 2014 World Team Table Tennis Championships are taking place in Tokyo, Japan this week, April 28-May 5, 2014.

209 table tennis teams from around the world are competing this year, including 114 men’s teams and 95 women’s teams.

A total of 138 International Table Tennis Umpires will officiate in Tokyo (68 from abroad, 70 from Tokyo).

The World Team Table Tennis Championships have been held since 1926.

China has dominated the World Team Championships, winning the Men’s Team title and the Women’s Team title 18 times.

The late Victor Barna is the most successful table tennis player in the history of the World Championships, playing 19 times between 1929 and 1954 winning a total of 22 titles.

Only three left-hander have won the Men’s Singles title at a World Championships: Stellan Bengtsson (1971), Seiji Ono (1979), Jean-Philippe Gatien (1993).

The 2015 World Team Table Tennis Championships will be held in Suzhou, China.

Good luck Team USA!

2014 U.S. World Team – Women

Lily Zhang
Prachi Jha
Crystal Wang
Erica Wu
Angela Guan

Coach Doru Gheorghe

2014 U.S. World Team – Men

Timothy Wang
Adam Hugh
Yahao Zhang
Jim Butler
Kanak Jha

Coach Stefan Feth

Watch live streaming of the matches at www.ittf.com.

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Nashville Predators/Newgy/NTTC Table Tennis Tournament Results

Jena Newgarden
The Nashville Predators/Newgy/NTTC Table Tennis/Ping-Pong Tournament was a hit!  75 pro table tennis players, recreational ping pong players and students competed on the main floor of the Bridgestone Arena in Nashville on Saturday, April 19, 2014.

The tournament featured three divisions to include players of all levels and ages. The pro division featured players with USATT ratings of 1200-2200.

Roger Dickson, Newgy’s Head Table Tennis Coach, did a great job running the tournament. We had several volunteers from the Nashville Table Tennis Club to help with registration and scorekeeping.

A big thanks to the Nashville Predators and Bridgestone Arena for hosting this fun table tennis event!

Congrats to all the winners!

Pro Division

1st Place:   Jude Lam, Knoxville, TN

2nd Place:   Donny Flowers, Memphis, TN

3rd Place:   Roger Jett, Murray, KY

Recreational Division

1st Place:   Rick Sati, Smyrna, TN

2nd Place:  Radu Rusu, Franklin, TN

3rd Place:  Iqbal Indawala, Nashville, TN

Junior (18 & Under) Division

1st Place:   Steven Dickerson, University School of Nashville

2nd Place:  Chance Waller, Smith Co. High School

3rd Place:  David Shayne, University School of Nashville

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“Lucky Loser” in Table Tennis Tournaments – Samson Dubina

Jena Newgarden
If you have ever played a world pro tour table tennis event, you are probably familiar with the term “lucky loser”.  So what does it mean?

A lucky loser is a table tennis player who loses in an event but still advances due to an opening in the draw.  For example, if there are 152 players entered in one pro tour event, there might be 32 players seeded into the single elimination and 120 players competing in round robin groups.  There would be 30 groups of four players per group with the winners advancing to meet the 32 seeded players.

To form a perfect single elimination draw, there should be 64 players.  After the groups finished, there would be 62 players remaining in the tournament – 32 seeded players and 30 qualifiers.  To meet the perfect 64 number, the table tennis tournament referee would put the names of the 30 second-place finishers in a hat and draw two names.  They call these two players “lucky losers.”  They lost in the groups but were still able to advance and keep playing.

So, the next time that you are playing in a world pro table tennis tour and hear the phrase “lucky loser” you will understand what it means.

Samson Dubina

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2014 College Table Tennis Championship Results

Jena Newgarden

Congratulations to the best of the best in college table tennis!

The 2014 TMS College Table Tennis National Championships were held this past weekend, April 4-6, 2014, in Monroeville, Pennsylvania. This marks the 11th consecutive year that Texas Wesleyan University has won!

Over 250 of the best college table tennis players competed, representing more than 40 different colleges and universities. They were battling for national titles in singles, doubles and team events.

Newgy has been a proud supporter and sponsor of College Table Tennis for many years and look forward to many more great tournaments at the College level and beyond.

2014 Championship Results:

Coed Team – Texas Wesleyan University

Women’s Team – Princeton University

Men’s Singles – Cheng Li, Mississippi College

Women’s Singles – Ariel Hsing, Princeton University

Men’s Doubles – Razvan Cretu & Zhedi Bai, Texas Wesleyan University

Women’s Doubles – Vivien Zhou & Xixi Guo, University of Toronto

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