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2018 C4NC NY Table Tennis Tournament 0

Sign up now for the 2018 C4NC NY Open Charity Table Tennis Tournament benefiting Care 4 Needy Copts

Date and Time: October 20, 2018: 9:00 am - 6:00 pm ET

Location: Samuel Field Y, 58-20 Little Neck Parkway, Little Neck, New York 11362

Format:  All table tennis matches are best 3 out of 5 table tennis games.

Many high rated table tennis athletes will be competing in this 3-star USATT sanctioned tournament including Mohamed El-Beiali (World ranked 112) and El-Sayed Lashin (World Ranked 311), both currently on the Egyptian National Table Tennis Team. Also attending will be the world famous Ibrahim Hamato, the amazing para table tennis player with no arms. 

For more information and to download the entry form, click here.  

Entry Deadline: Oct 13, 2018

Newgy is proud to be one of the sponsors of this tournament along with SATTAPaddle Palace and Donic.

2018 Knoxville Joseph Newgarden Memorial Open Table Tennis Tournament 0

Sign up today! Newgy is proud to be one of sponsors for the Knoxville Joseph Newgarden Memorial Summer Gold Dollar Upset Open Table Tennis Tournament set for August 4, 2018 at the Cecil Webb Recreation Center at 923 Baker Ave., Knoxville, Tennessee 37920. 

The tournament format will be giant round robin and will have two stages. The first stage will be a giant round robin in which 36 table tennis players will be split into two divisions. The top 18 rated players will be in the Upper division and the lower 18 rated players will be in the Lower division.  For each division, there will be two groups of 9 players.  So each player will play 8 table tennis matches within the group.

The top two finishes of each group will advance to the division’s semi-finals and final.  The looser of the Semi-Finals will play for a 3rd place match.  Please note that unrated players will not be allowed to advance to the single elimination stage if the estimated rating is grossly incorrect, i.e. if the highest rated player beaten by the unrated player has a larger rating difference of 200 points.  The next qualified player will take the spot instead.

The Gold Dollar Upset format - the winner of every upset match played between two USATT rated table tennis players will receive Upset Gold Dollar.  The rules for winning the upset Gold Dollar are:

  1. Gold Dollars will be paid to winners of all upsets, regardless of player’s rating.
  2. Winners of each and every upset will receive gold dollars using the following payout schedule:
    1. Rating difference: 100 or less, Gold Dollar reward: $5.00
    2. Rating difference: 101 to 150, Gold Dollar reward: $10.00
    3. Rating difference: 151 or larger, Gold Dollar reward: $15.00
  3. The gold dollars will be paid immediately upon confirmation of match sheets showing upsets on a first come first get paid basis until the funds run out. KTTC reserves $200 Gold Dollars for this payout.  So sharpen your table tennis game and hit the court ready to win!
  4. Rating used to determine the upsets will be the USATT ratings of record as of 09:00 a.m. Friday August 03, 2018. Only USATT rated players prior to the date of the tournament are eligible to win gold dollars.

Entry deadline is August 1, 2018. Early entry discount deadline is July 23, 2018.

To download the tournament blank entry form, please click here.

To sign up online, please click here.

For additional tournament information, please contact Jude Lam at 865-300-4829 or email to knoxvilletabletennisclub@gmail.com.


We look forward to seeing you at this tournament in memory of Newgy's wonderful Founder, Mr. Joe Newgarden, Jr.

2018 U.S. National Table Tennis Championships 0

Register now for the 2018 U.S. National Table Tennis Championships in Las Vegas, Nevada July 2-7.

The main events will be held at the Las Vegas Convention Center and the U.S. Open Final Table Celebration location is still to be determined.

Tournament events include: Men's and Women's Singles, Men's and Women's Doubles, Mixed Doubles, Cadet Boys and Girls, Junior Boys and Girls, Teams, as well as many more including Veterans, Seniors, Legends, Para, Hardbat and Sandpaper.

Entry deadline is May 25, 2018.

For more information and to register, click here.

Investigating, Implementing, Performing - Developing a Table Tennis Tournament Goal 0

One year at the U.S. National Table Tennis Team Trials, I was leading 3-2 against Mark Hazinski* and leading 9-3 in the 6th game.  After a series of aggressive mistakes by me, he closed the gap 9-8.  I simply pushed and blocked the next 2 points to end the match 11-8 in the 6th.  Walking off the court, my coach said, “I would rather have you lose the match than to win it like that.”  I replied, “The goal was to win.”

There are different types of tournaments that I would like to address in this article.

Investigating

Most table tennis players want to improve and break the 1200 rating barrier or 1800 barrier or 2000 barrier, or whatever.  When I ask them what necessary areas of their game they hope to improve, they are often speechless.  If you don’t know what to improve, then play a table tennis tournament to investigate what you need to work on this year.  Record your matches and watch them within 1-2 days of playing.  You should be able to come up with a list of 5-6 things that you need to perfect during the next 12 months.  Investigating tournaments are critically important for long-term planning.

Implementing

When you are developing new table tennis skills, it is often good to avoid match play and tournaments initially.  After several weeks of training, you need to learn to implement your new skills into club matches, league matches, and tournaments.  The tournaments where you implement new things are usually “bad tournaments” because you need to force yourself to do the right thing, which means sacrificing some matches and often sacrificing lots of rating points. 

Performing

When looking for good results, you need to perform according to what will win.  In the above situation that I mentioned (in the beginning of this article), I hit a rut.  My attack wasn’t working.  I needed that win in order to possibly make the National Team.  I did what was necessary and used pushing and blocking to win the 6th game.  Had my goal been to implement my flip or backhand loop or counterloop, then I played wrong at 9-8.  But my goal for that table tennis tournament was performing and taking the title, so I did what was necessary.

You and your table tennis coach MUST talk about the goal for each tournament. 

What is your goal? 

Many players say they are going to implement new things then are furiously mad when they go down 100 points; instead they need to judge their performance by their ability to implement, not their ability to win.  Others say they want to implement something new but then go back to their old ways.  Others want to perform and have good results, but feel guilty for pushing and blocking.  Regardless of your playing style, age, or level, you MUST have a goal for the tournament.  About 3-4 weeks before the competition, have a discussion with your coach regarding the goal, train according to it, and perform according to it!

*By the way, credit to Mark Hazinski, he has beat me over 50 times in table tennis tournaments.  This article was not meant to be derogatory to him.  I just used a personal example to illustrate my main point.

Samson Dubina

Devastate the “Cheater” in Table Tennis 0

In competitive sports, there are always athletes who want to win so badly, that they will do absolutely anything to accomplish that goal.  Yes, there are cheaters in the sport of table tennis too.  Instead of giving you dozens of examples of how cheaters get away with it, I’m going to give you a more general perspective on how you can properly handle any situation that arises.

The number one most important aspect when dealing with a fair-playing opponent or a cheater, is to give your best!  If you say, “I was playing great until he did this…. or that…”  You need to be mentally strong, shake it off, and re-focus on the task at hand.  If you say, “It was a close battle, BUT when he started cheating, I got mad and crushed him!”  Then you need to have the same level of determination and focus regardless if your opponent is cheating or playing fair, regardless if you are up against a competitor, a practice partner, or a complete stranger.

Here are some closing comments that might help you through the situation.  The first two comments are pre table tennis tournament ideas, the next four comments are in-the-moment ideas, and the final comment is a post table tennis match idea:

#1 Expect Some Drama

As you prepare for a table tennis tournament, just expect some cheating from your opponent.  In the upcoming weeks and months leading toward the U.S. Nationals, you need to mentally be prepared for it.  Like I mentioned (without being specific), there are dozens of different ways to cheat.  You need to expect it and actually ask your coach to apply some of the cheating methods during your table tennis training sessions.

#2 Evaluate Yourself

Sometimes you might not even realize if you yourself are cheating.  Take an hour to read through the official table tennis rules, applying each rule to yourself. 

#3 Stay Calm

During the table tennis tournament, if someone is cheating, try to stay calm.  Most cheaters want you to get worked up, tight, angry, trying to muscle the ball because you are mad.  Go back to your think circle, think about your tactics, and play your best.

#4 Evaluate the Advantage

This is one of the main points.  If the cheating doesn’t give any advantage, then why get all worked up over the cheating?  You are in a match against a 3’ tall kid who is wearing white shorts.  He always stays close to the table and the white shorts are never visible during the point.  Ok, what is the big deal?  Why are you red-in-the-face angry about this six-year-old cheater who isn’t getting an advantage from his white shorts.  Evaluating the advantage is basically stepping back and saying, “Is he getting any advantage to his cheating?”

#5 Seek Help

If your opponent is getting an advantage, then ask for a tournament umpire.  The umpire will know the rules and will deal with the situation.  Please keep in mind that the umpire will be evaluating both of you.  There are many situations where the umpire comes and finds both table tennis players to be cheating.

#6 Agree With the Decision

This is the toughest point.  Once the umpire has made a decision, agree with it.  You might not like it, but agree with it.  If you stay positive and agree with his decision, you will be able to regain your focus and continue playing well throughout the tournament.  If you keep fighting with a bad call in your mind, it will mess up your match and possibly even mess up your entire tournament.  Many bad performances can be traced back to one bad call.  Let it go, agree with it, and perform your best!

#7 Forget It

After the table tennis match, should you remember it or forget it?  In every match, you need to be able to somewhat remember the main tactics and briefly analyze your performance.  On the other hand, you need to forget about the cheater and forget about the incident.  If you continue racing around the tournament loudly declaring what that guy did to you and how much of a cheater he really is…  then it will not be good for you, not be good for your performance, not be good for the cheater, and really not be good for the sport.  Forget it, move on, and play your best in the next match.

Samson Dubina

2017 U.S. Open Table Tennis Championships – Tentative Event Schedule 0

The USATT has just released the tentative event schedule for the 2017 U.S. Open Table Tennis Championships in Las Vegas, Nevada scheduled for December 17-22, 2017.

This 5-star ITTF sanctioned table tennis tournament includes events for Men’s and Women’s Singles, Men’s and Women’s Doubles, Mixed Doubles, Hardbat, Sandpaper, Teams, Para and more.

For more details on the tentative schedule, click here.