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Coach Forum

Robot Training

ROBO-COACH:

SMASHING

By Larry Hodges

 

One of the best drills you can do on your Newgy robot (or in any practice session) is a smashing drill. On the Newgy robot, smashing drills are easy to do, because the robot gives you a consistent ball to smash, and keeps giving you ball after ball. With a live practice partner, the rally would end after most smashes.

By giving you a consistent ball, the robot allows you to work out the kinks in your stroke, knowing that any mistakes are because of your technique, not because of your practice partner giving you variable returns (i.e., different placement, speed, height, depth, trajectory, or spin).

Because you get to do the stroke over and over with no stopping of play, you get a far more efficient workout than if you have to stop after each shot while someone fetches the ball. It is this constant repetition that enables you to develop a "repeating stroke," one that you can do over and over in any situation.

Once you have perfected the smash against the robot, you should practice against live competition so that you can learn to adjust to variable returns.

All the practice on the robot isn't going to help too much if your smashing technique is incorrect. In fact, practicing a poor technique makes it that much more difficult to change later on.

Using the robot, you can practice smashing against both topspin and backspin. The shots are similar, but with a few key differences.

SMASHING: The Basics

It is assumed that you have a decent forehand drive (Editor’s note: also known as counter, hit, or counter-drive) already, and can hit forehand-to-forehand somewhat consistently. What is the difference between a regular forehand drive and a smash?

Obviously, it is the speed of the ball that you are trying to maximize, while still controlling the shot. To maximize power, you need to use your entire body, especially the legs, waist, shoulders and forearm.

Backswing: Twist your waist around more than usual, so that you are nearly facing sideways. Bring your racket farther back than usual, with most of your weight on your back foot.

Even if the ball is very high, backswing almost straight back, then raise the racket to the proper height. The backswing and the raising of the racket should be one continuous motion. This enables you to keep better balance.

Forward swing: Start forward swing with the legs, then the waist, then the shoulders, and lastly the forearm. There should be a powerful forearm snap just before contact. (Editor’s note: this sequence of muscular contractions is very important for maximum acceleration. Start by pushing your weight forward with the back leg, then twist your waist and shoulders into the ball, and then snapping the forearm forward. If you start one muscle group too early or too late, your power will be greatly diminished.)

Contact: Sink the ball straight into the sponge so that it sinks through to the wood. There should be a loud wood sound. Make sure to hit downward on high balls. Whenever possible, hit the ball at the top of the bounce. (Editor’s note: this increases your margin for error and provides more possibiities for placing your shot.)

Try to keep the racket angle constant around the contact point, or you will lose control. Preferably, your racket angle should have been decided before you start the forward swing. It is okay to close your racket some as you swing forward, but never open your racket as you smash, or you will get an out-of-control backspin shot that will usually fly off the end. (This can be used against a high, short ball, but is not really necessary.)

Follow-through: Let the racket follow through naturally forward.

SMASHING AGAINST TOPSPIN
(See Photo 9 in Coaching Article Archives)
You will have to close your racket slightly against topspin—aim slightly downward. Against a somewhat high topspin, you should start your forward swing with the racket slightly above the contact point, and hit slightly downward. The harder you hit the ball, however, the less the spin will take on your racket, and the less you have to worry about the spin. Watch for the sudden bounce as the incoming ball hits the table - the topspin will make the ball take a fast, lower bounce.

SMASHING AGAINST BACKSPIN
(See Photo 16 in Coaching Article Archives)

The main difference in smashing against backspin is that you may have to start with your racket either directly behind or even slightly below the ball. Against a relatively low backspin ball, or against one with extremely heavy backspin, you will start with the racket slightly below the ball and stroke slightly upward. The harder you hit the ball, the less you will have to do this.

You can smash a backspin ball just as you smashed against a topspin ball, sinking the ball straight into the sponge and to the wood. However, you will get more control (but less speed) if you hit the ball with a slight upward motion, hitting the ball with more of a glancing blow, creating some topspin.

A ball with backspin does not bounce out very much, so stay close to the table. Normally, you should hit the ball at the top of the bounce, but many players hit backspins on the rise—sacrificing some speed for quickness. By hitting the ball on the rise, the ball also tends to bounce upward off your racket, helping you combat the backspin. This is especially effective for pips-out players.