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Strive for Dexterity in Table Tennis – Samson Dubina

Filed under: Samson Dubina — Tags: , , , , , , , — by Jena on April 17, 2014 @ 10:53 am

Every table tennis player should strive for dexterity.  This is a skill that some players are naturally more gifted with and some players are not.  The good news is that it can be trained as well.  So what is dexterity?

Dictionary Definition of “Dexterity”

dex·ter·i·ty

noun \dek-ˈster-ə-tē, -ˈste-rə-\

: the ability to use your hands skillfully

: the ability to easily move in a way that is graceful

: clever skill : the ability to think and act quickly and cleverly

In regards to table tennis, dexterity can mean several different things.  It can mean…

1. Having the ability to learn a new stroke

2. Having the ability to relax even while swinging hard

3. Having the ability to be extremely precise and accurate

4. Having the ability to put impart speed and spin on the ball with very little effort

5. Having the ability to adjust the stroke for various types of balls

I will focus on the fifth type of dexterity in table tennis.

Dexterity is the ability to adjust to various aspects of the ping pong ball – adjust to the speed of the ball, adjust to the placement of the ball, adjust to the depth of the ball, adjust to the height of the ball and adjust to the spin on the ball.  I will use the forehand loop as my example.

In order to develop more dexterity in your forehand loop, you must be able to adjust your swing based on the different speeds of the incoming balls.  Ask your table tennis training partner to block to your forehand and vary the speed of the block – sometimes slightly harder and sometimes slightly slower.  Keep your racket in front and backswing once you see the approaching ball.  If the ball is blocked quickly, then shorten your loop while still generating a lot of spin.  Always keep your weight leaning forward and contact the ball in front of your body.

In order to develop more dexterity in your forehand loop, you must be able to adjust your swing based on the placement of the incoming balls.  Ask your training partner to move the ball around in the forehand 50% of the ping pong table.  Watch your opponent’s racket and adjust your feet into position before swinging.  Once your feet are set, then take a swing.  If you are in good position, loop slightly harder with a longer swing.  If you are off-balance and forced to reach or lean for the ball, shorten your swing, focus on control, brush the ball with spin, then get in better position for the next loop.

In order to develop more dexterity in your forehand loop, you must be able to adjust your swing based on the depth of the incoming balls.  For this exercise, I would recommend starting very slowly.  Set up your Newgy Robo-Pong table tennis robot to throw the ball once every 3 seconds or have your training partner feed multiball.  If the ball is slow and lands near the net, move both feet forward and loop near the table.  If the ball is deep near the end line, then move back slightly and loop the deep ball.  When moving forward (for right-handed table tennis players), step with your right foot then the left foot.  When moving backward, step with the left foot then the right foot.  Both feet actually move simultaneously, however, the outside foot always initiates the movement.  When moving in-and-out, make sure to stay with your weight leaning forward.  Focus on moving your feet very fast while looping with control.

In order to develop more dexterity in your forehand loop, you must be able to adjust your swing based on the height of the incoming balls.  Ask your training partner to adjust his block sometimes higher and sometimes lower.  Keep your racket in front of your body and take your backswing once you see the height of the incoming ball.  For the forehand loop against topspin, try to start your swing directly behind the ball and loop forward with spin.  If the ball is higher, then start your racket higher.  If your racket is lower, then start your racket lower.

In order to develop more dexterity in your forehand loop, you must be able to adjust your swing based on the various spins of the incoming balls.  Ask your training partner to vary the spin on his block, sometimes he should block normal with slight topspin, sometimes he should spin over the ball with more topspin and sometimes he should chop-block.  If he adds topspin, the ball will jump up as it contacts your side of the table.  If he performs a chop-block, the ball with slow down as it contacts your side of the table.  Adjust your racket height and body position to the incoming ball.  This is the most challenging of all the exercises.  Don’t be discouraged if it takes several months to perfect this aspect of dexterity.

Every table tennis player should strive for dexterity.  I am convinced that dexterity should be trained.  In your training sessions, you should make it just as challenging as or more challenging than an actual game.  Be ready to adjust for various speeds, placements, depths, heights, and spins and you will be on your way to success!

Samson Dubina

 

Changing Your Mindset in Table Tennis – Samson Dubina

Filed under: Samson Dubina — Tags: , , , , , — by Jena on April 15, 2014 @ 11:08 am

A topic seldom addressed in table tennis, but very important, is about changing your mindset in regards to your opponent’s strengths.

Many table tennis players fear their opponent’s strengths so much that it messes up all aspects of their game.  Instead of fearing the strength, try to use the strength against them.

Here are some examples:

  1. Your opponent’s serve is very short and very low.  Generally, you are able to loop the serve and start the point out with attacking.  However, this opponent’s serve cannot be looped.  Instead of getting frustrated, you should be able to push his short serve short and wait to loop the following ball.
  2. Your opponent’s push is extremely heavy and you can’t power-loop the first ball.  Instead of getting frustrated, you should use your legs, open your angle, and brush the ball for a slightly slower and spinnier loop.  After he blocks your opening loop, you can follow-up with a stronger loop.
  3. Your opponent’s flip is very fast.  Instead of getting frustrated with the speed, you should shorten your swing, make contact with the ball, and return it quickly to a good location.  He probably won’t be ready for you to return it and the quick return will probably force him to block.  After he blocks, then you can take over with a speed shot.
  4. Your opponent’s loop is extremely powerful.  Instead of getting frustrated with his “weapon”, you should focus on returning only one loop.  By getting low, keeping your table tennis racket high and in front of you, and controlling the block, you should be able to manage to return one loop.  Once your opponent realizes that you can return it, he might slow it down and go for better placement or he might attempt to speed it up and become more inconsistent.

Try your best to play your strengths against your opponent’s weaknesses in table tennis.  However, when they do use their strengths, don’t fear them – just return them with control!

Samson Dubina

Stay in the Right Zone in Table Tennis – Samson Dubina

Filed under: Samson Dubina — Tags: , , — by Jena on April 9, 2014 @ 2:58 pm

Professional table tennis players clearly understand their potential and limitations.  They know how hard they should loop, where to loop, when to loop, and when not to loop.  Ma Long loops most of his balls with 60-95% power.  His selection on how hard to loop depends on his positioning, his distance from the ping-pong table, his opponent’s return, and his opponent’s positioning.   Timo Ball loops most of his balls with 40-80% power; this is the zone that he feels most comfortable playing.

Now, let’s move the scenario to YOU…

You have a played a great table tennis match looping consistently from both forehand and backhand.  You are playing an opponent that you have never beaten before.  You are at 2-2 in games and now you have match-point at 10-9 in the fifth.  You know that you should attack first.  How hard should you attack?  Within your zone!  Know your limits and do what you do best!

If you loop too hard, you might lose control and make an unforced error.  If you loop too soft, you might lose control because your opponent’s backspin push will bite into your rubber making it more difficult for you.  Swing through the ball, complete your stroke, have confidence in your loop, and treat it like any other normal loop.  Remember, you need to have some racket-speed in order to generate spin.  Spin gives you control, which makes you more consistent.  Consistency is one of the main keys to winning every table tennis match!

Samson Dubina

2014 College Table Tennis Championship Results

Filed under: Newgy — Tags: , , — by Jena on April 8, 2014 @ 6:15 pm

Congratulations to the best of the best in college table tennis!

The 2014 TMS College Table Tennis National Championships were held this past weekend, April 4-6, 2014, in Monroeville, Pennsylvania. This marks the 11th consecutive year that Texas Wesleyan University has won!

Over 250 of the best college table tennis players competed, representing more than 40 different colleges and universities. They were battling for national titles in singles, doubles and team events.

Newgy has been a proud supporter and sponsor of College Table Tennis for many years and look forward to many more great tournaments at the College level and beyond.

2014 Championship Results:

Coed Team – Texas Wesleyan University

Women’s Team – Princeton University

Men’s Singles – Cheng Li, Mississippi College

Women’s Singles – Ariel Hsing, Princeton University

Men’s Doubles – Razvan Cretu & Zhedi Bai, Texas Wesleyan University

Women’s Doubles – Vivien Zhou & Xixi Guo, University of Toronto

 

 

Newgy Akron Open Table Tennis Tournament – Results

Filed under: Newgy,Samson Dubina — Tags: , , , — by Jena on March 25, 2014 @ 9:52 am

The Newgy Akron Open Table Tennis Tournament this past weekend, March 21-22, had a great turnout! 96 total table tennis players participated from near and far, including Mississippi, Illinois, Michigan, Kentucky, West Virginia, Pennsyvania, New York and even Canada and Germany.

Here are the results:

Open Giant Round Robin
1st Wang Zhen (rated 2822)
2nd Cheng Li (rated 2598)
3rd Yi Chi Zhang (rated 2584)
4th Samson Dubina (rated 2497)
5th-6th Nachiket Joshi and Junyu Xiao
7th-8th Seyed Hesam Hamrahian and Keith Pech

Under 2100 Giant Round Robin
1st Burak Cevik
2nd Aleksandr Itunin
3rd-4th Roger Liu and James Hamilton
5th-8th Rick Akers, Bob New, Shreyans Bafna, and Harsh Khandelwal

Under 1700 Giant Round Robin
1st Mario Letic
2nd Ed Zadrozny
3rd Raymond Johnston
4th Mike Wilke
5th-8th Ashwin Turakhia, David Sommers, Joe Ciarrochi, and Richard Beer

Under 1300 Giant Round Robin
1st Mike Burchfield
2nd Anwen Harris
3rd Daniel Waugaman
4th Richard Beer
5th-8th Dick Bennett, Jeff Shiff, David Sommers, Ron Martin

Open Doubles
1st Samson Dubina/Shreyans Bafna
2nd Cheng Li/Yi Chi Zhang
3rd-4th Zhiqiao Xie/Keith Pech and Hesam Hamrahian/Ali Khatami

Handicap
1st Cheng Li
2nd Daniel Waugaman
3rd-4th Ron Martin and Gary Hobrath

Junior Recreational
1st Andrew Heiser
2nd Noah Sussman
3rd-4th Annie Liu and Sarah Sommers

Adult Recreational
1st Stephen Faulstich
2nd Lee Szwast

Check back for dates and details of upcoming table tennis tournaments.

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