Newgy's Blog

2014 Transplant Games of America – Table Tennis

Filed under: Newgy — Tags: , , — by Jena on July 23, 2014 @ 2:33 pm

The 2014 Transplant Games of America were held July 11-15 in Houston, Texas.  The multi-sport festival event promotes the need for Organ and Tissue donation. Eligible athletes have received a life-saving transplant. The competition includes 18 different sports and games including table tennis, bowling, basketball, cycling, trivia challenge and more.

The Table Tennis Tournament included Men’s and Women’s divisions, ages 11-70+.

Congrats to our friend Gay Eisen of Nashville, Tennessee, who won the Silver in her age group. She practices on her Robo-Pong ping pong robot and has trained with Newgy’s Coach Roger Dickson for several years at the Newgy Table Tennis Center.

For complete tournament results, click here.

2014 U.S. Open Table Tennis Championship Results

Filed under: Newgy — Tags: , , , , , — by Jena on July 13, 2014 @ 3:05 pm

700 top table tennis players from around the world competed in the 2014 U.S. Open Table Tennis Championship last week. About 100 ping-pong tables were filled with some of the best players at the DeVos Convention Center in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Congrats to all the winners in the more than 80 event divisions, which included Men’s and Women’s Singles, Doubles, Hardbat, Sandpaper, Wheelchair, Junior Boys and Girls and many more.

Wenzhang Tao of China took home the Gold in the Men’s Singles division and Yuko Fujii of Japan earned the Gold in the Women’s Singles division.

A special congratulations to Newgy’s sponsored player and friend, Sameh Awadallah (Boshra) for earning 2nd Place in the 030 Men’s Division.

For complete tournament results, click here.

The Attacking Mindset in Table Tennis

Filed under: Samson Dubina — Tags: , , , , — by Jena on July 9, 2014 @ 8:00 am

If you are an offensive table tennis player, there are two aspects of the game that you need to master.

The first aspect is – Creating the opportunity to attack first.  I hear many table tennis club players telling themselves throughout the night, “Just use your attack!”  Well that sounds nice, but how are you going to create the opportunity.  There are several ways.

  1. Try to loop long serves
  2. Try to loop half-long serves
  3. Try to serve short and push short so that your opponent can’t easily loop first
  4. Try to loop most of the long pushes
  5. Try to loop most of the flips

After you make the opening attack, try to continue attacking by following up with another ball and another ball.  Against a good table tennis player, it will likely take 3-4 strong attacks to win the point.

The second aspect is – Being consistent in your attack.  Even if you can create the opportunity to attack, that doesn’t mean that you will win; that merely means that you have the ability to attack.  Your target should be to make 80-90% of your attacks on with both your backhand and your forehand.  If you are making 100% of your opening attacks on and still losing, then you possibly need to give more spin variation, speed variation, and placement variation.  If you are inconsistent on your attacks, then consider adjusting your technique in the following ways.

  1. Try to move into position better
  2. Try to read the amount of spin that your opponent is giving you
  3. Try to adjust the height of your backswing based on the spin and based on the height of the ball
  4. Try to adjust the length of your swing based on the speed of the ball
  5. Try to adjust your racket angle based on the spin on the ball
  6. Try to focus on spin as your primary weapon and use speed as your secondary weapon

You should significantly see your attacking game improve if you focus on these key areas. Good luck!

Samson Dubina

You Don’t Play Well in Table Tennis Tournaments Because…

Filed under: Samson Dubina — Tags: , , — by Jena on July 7, 2014 @ 8:00 am

You don’t adapt quickly enough!

Playing well in table tennis tournaments involves two major factors – being able to perform under pressure and being adaptable to the situation. This blog will focus on the second factor – being adaptable to the situation. There are five things that you can do to learn to become a tough tournament player!

1. You must learn to adapt to various playing condition quickly.  I would recommend practicing in various places on a regular basis – large courts and small courts, high ceiling and low ceiling, 1” ping pong tables and 3/4 “ ping pong tables, wood floor, cement floor and rubber floor, practice table tennis balls and 3-star Premium table tennis balls, bright lighting and dim lighting.  But you might say, “Won’t better conditions make me play better and poor conditions make me play worse?”  Not necessarily.  It all becomes a matter of what you are used to playing with.  Try to play at various table tennis clubs, try to use all the different types of tables at your club, try to play at various tournament venues, try to play at different friends’ houses, and try to play at various rec centers and learn to quickly adapt to each facility.

2. You must learn to adapt to various table tennis tournament times.  If you play in the U.S. Table Tennis Open this July, you might have a match on Wednesday morning at 9 .am., then you might have a match on Thursday night at 8:30 p.m.  For the table tennis players living in California, playing a 9 a.m. match at the U.S. Open in Michigan will actually feel like 6 a.m.!   The point is you must be able to perform at your peak at various times of the day.  So vary your practice times.  Wake up at 7 a.m. and have an 8 a.m. practice session with the Newgy Robo-Pong table tennis robot.  Go to a friend’s house at 9 p.m. and play some late-night games.  Prepare your mind and body to adapt!

3. You must learn to adapt to various warm-up levels.  Here is the biggest excuse for losses in table tennis tournaments, “I didn’t get enough warm-up!”  Often, you might go to the training hall with a practice partner, jog and stretch for 20 minutes, practice basic forehands and backhands for 20 minutes, do two footwork drills, do two serve-and-attack drills, and then wrap up with some games.  At the end of the session, you are feeling good and everything is warmed-up for the games.  In tournaments, you might not have a table available for warm-up.  You can warm-up you mind and warm-up your body with jogging and stretching. BUT you might not have a practice table available for your normal routine.  For this reason, I would recommend regularly playing some practice games in the beginning of your training session, so that you can learn to adapt quickly and perform well, even when you don’t feel great.

4. You must learn to adapt to various fatigue levels.  Here is the second major excuse that I often hear, “I was just too tired.”  Really?  You are going to lose that final table tennis match because you were just too tired.  Well, you certainly need to work on your table tennis conditioning so that doesn’t happen again!  You should do some intense workouts prior to your table tennis matches so that you learn to play with fatigue.  Go for a 4-5 mile jog then go to the club and play four hours of matches.  Do 30 all-out wind sprints, then serve a few short, low serves.  Do 50 push-ups, then play a 9-9 game against your rival at the club.  Train tired and learn to adapt even when you feel that you are completely out of energy.

5. You must learn to adapt to various table tennis opponents.  This is the biggest challenge in tournaments.  You might first play against a looper, then a long pips blocker, then a lobber, then a lefty, then a short pips smasher, then a chopper.  You can’t apply the same strategy to each opponent.  This is the main point in winning tournaments!  You must go into every match like a detective, trying to find every clue possible about your opponent’s strengths and weaknesses and you must be able to QUICKLY adapt to heavy pushes and light pushes, strong loops and weak loops, fast blocks and dead blocks.  I would recommend playing with as many different players as possible on a regular basis.  Instead of merely practicing with the same two people at the club, be willing to move outside of the norm and play with lower or higher rated table tennis players.  By playing a wide range of various styles, you will learn to adapt and become a well-rounded tournament player.

Samson Dubina

What to Do When You Can’t Stop Your Opponent in Table Tennis

Filed under: Samson Dubina — Tags: , , , , , — by Jena on July 4, 2014 @ 8:00 am

Your table tennis opponent is attacking your short serve and you are frustrated that you can’t stop him or her from attacking your serve.

What should you do?

Well, you must realize that with modern equipment and modern strokes, he or she will likely be able to attack all of your serves – regardless of how spinny, low, or short you serve.

The first key is to serve in such a way that he or she can’t tee-off hard on your serve.  By mixing up long, short, and half-long serves it will be very difficult for him or her to attack strong.  Also, if you serve very low, heavy backspin short to the forehand, your opponent probably won’t be able to produce much spin on the flip.  If you serve to the backhand short, your opponent might be able to generate spin using the wrist – similar to Zhang Jike.

The second key is to learn how to attack the flip.  If you merely block the flip, then your opponent will likely finish you off with a strong loop.  If you are able to start your racket high, shorten your backswing, and loop with good control, then you will likely take the attack away from your opponent and he or she will usually block the next ball.  Avoid blocking flips AND avoid hitting too hard against flips.  Because the flip is so close to you, you don’t have much time to adjust to the various speeds, spins, and trajectories.  So, watch where your opponent is flipping, adjust with your feet, start your hand high, and loop with control to a good location.

There is no reason to get frustrated trying to completely STOP your opponent from flipping your serve, instead, serve in such a way that he or she cannot flip hard and BE PREPARED to attack their flip.  A good example of how to attack flips can be seen in Dimitrij Ovtcharov’s match against Zhang Jike at the 2014 World Table Tennis Championship.

Samson Dubina

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